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Theme
Reduce for the good, Recycle for the better, and Reuse for the best
- Recycling 2023

Welcome Message

Warm Welcome!!!

It is an honor and privilege for us to extend a warm welcome to all of the esteemed speakers and attendees of the 12th International conference on Recycling and Waste Management Conference, which will take place in Prague, Czech Republic from May 11-13, 2023.

Recycling 2023 aims to bring together individuals from all over the world, including renowned ecologists, scientists, environmental engineers, research personalities, recycling scientists, climate experts, wastewater treatment researchers, recycling specialists, businesspeople, and waste management industry professionals, to have a basic stage for them to share their experience, learning, and research work in the field of recycling and waste management, as well as to bring up new technological advancements.

Market Analysis

Waste generation:

Humans produce about 2 billion metric tons of solid waste annually through their businesses, households, and industries.

Looking ahead, it is anticipated that global waste will increase to 3.40 billion metric tons by 2050, more than doubling population growth during that time. The generation of waste and income level are generally positively correlated. In contrast to lower- and middle-income countries, where it is anticipated to rise by roughly 40% or more, daily per capita waste generation in high-income countries is projected to rise by 19% by 2050. When income levels change incrementally, waste generation initially declines at the lowest income levels and then rises more quickly there than at higher income levels.

By 2050, it is anticipated that the total amount of waste produced in low-income countries will have increased by more than three times. The Middle East and North Africa region produces the least amount of waste globally, at 6%, while East Asia and the Pacific account for 23% of global waste production. However, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa are the fastest-growing regions, and by 2050, it is anticipated that the total amount of waste generated in each of these regions will more than triple, double, and double, respectively. More than half of the waste generated in these areas is currently disposed of openly, and the trajectory of waste growth will have significant negative effects on the environment, human health, and economic growth, necessitating immediate action.

East Asia and the Pacific region are where the majority of municipal solid waste (MSW) is produced. China produces the most municipal solid waste (over 15%), as one might anticipate from a nation with a population of 1.4 billion. However, the US produces the most waste per person when measured in terms of population. The United States accounts for about 5% of global population but generates 12% of the world's solid waste. It also holds the distinction of being the world's largest producer of food waste.

You might be surprised to learn that in Europe, Denmark has the highest waste production rates per capita. Yes, the supposedly clean and environmentally friendly Scandinavian country generates just as much waste per person as the US.

Canada is at the top of the list when it comes to hazardous, industrial, and agricultural waste. The prevalence of heavy industries like metal fabrication and oil refining is primarily to blame for this.

Recycling Market analysis:

The market for recycling is anticipated to grow significantly between 2022 and 2029, during the forecast period. The market is expanding steadily in 2022, and due to key players' increasing adoption of strategies, the market is anticipated to grow over the anticipated time frame.

The product's performance will be further optimized by technological innovation and advancement, opening up a wider range of downstream market applications. Additionally, in order to fully understand the recycling market, it is important for us to consider customer preference analysis, market dynamics, new product releases, the impact of COVID-19, regional conflicts, and carbon neutrality.

Waste and income are directly related; the more money a person makes, the more he will spend on purchases, which will ultimately lead to waste. In addition, industries make a significant contribution to the production of waste.

Currently, about 19% of the world's waste is recycled, and more efforts are being made to recycle more waste, illustrating the enormous market potential. Recycling was created in response to the need to reuse waste that was amassing rather than dispose of it in the environment.

The market share of recycling facilities has been expanding quickly, fueling expansion in the world market for waste recycling. Additionally, rising environmental concerns and consumer awareness are helping to make waste recycling market successful.

The global waste recycling market, which was estimated to be worth $55.1 billion in 2020, could grow to a $90 billion industry by 2030. This significant growth will be brought about by increased efforts from all stakeholders and growing awareness of the harmful effects of waste on the environment.

Humans currently produce a variety of wastes, including industrial non-hazardous waste, hazardous waste, agricultural and animal waste, medical waste, radioactive waste, construction and demolition waste, waste from extraction and mining, waste from oil and gas production, waste from the combustion of fossil fuels, etc.

The amount of waste produced in each nation varies, as do the rates at which it is recycled. Almost every nation on the planet is working to achieve waste management, one of the major UN sustainable development goals. When it comes to managing and recycling waste, some nations excel while others perform about averagely.

Countries all over the world are constantly coming up with fresh and creative ways to put eco-friendly recycling policies into practice. The best recycling nations in the world are highlighted here, along with some of their innovative and sustainable programs.

The top five nations with the highest recycling rates are Germany, South Korea, Slovenia, Austria, and the Netherlands.

Poland is at the top of the list of nations that have improved the most. Amazingly, it is recycling 886% more waste than it was at the beginning of the millennium. In the same time frame, recycling increased by 600% in Estonia, 261% in Ireland, and 250% in the UK.

Across the board, recycling has improved in all nations by 42%. That's encouraging because waste management will be crucial over the course of the following century.

The global waste recycling market is nevertheless facing numerous difficulties due to incineration, an increase in e-waste, environmental contamination, etc. despite its rapid growth. It is imperative to approach these problems in a methodical and appropriate way.

Furthermore, there are infinite resources on the planet. Countries will have adopted more sustainable waste management techniques to ensure that resources are used more than once in order to accommodate a growing population and rising living standards around the world. Otherwise, not enough resources will be available for everyone.

Recycling Congress 2023 will be crucial platform to discuss the aforementioned issues by eminent persons by communicating their knowledge in Recycling and waste management sector.

About Conference

About the conference

We would like to take this opportunity to officially announce the 12th International Conference on Recycling and Waste Management, which will be held in Prague, Czech Republic from May 11-13, 2023. Reduce for the good, recycle for the better, and reuse for the best is the conference's theme. We invite eminent speakers to present at our conference from universities all over the world.

Plastic recycling, wastewater treatment and management techniques, solid waste management, climatic changes, renewable and non-renewable resources, treatment of all types of waste products, waste disposal, recycling and reuse of waste materials, and energy conversion from waste are just a few of the cutting-edge topics that will be covered at Recycling 2023.

Aim of the conference

  • To discuss and compare the most recent developments in waste management, pollution control, and recycling.
  • The above topic, which provides a ray of hope in the waste management and recycling sectors and inspires us to conserve the environment, will indeed be discussed by prominent experts from all over the world.
  • On this global dais platform, young researchers are given the chance to demonstrate their ideas and research findings.
  • International collaboration and sharing of new ideas, research, and issues in the recycling, pollution control, and waste management sectors.
  • To improve journal articles and speeches on recycling and waste management.

Advantages of attending the conference

Through oral presentations, video presentations, poster presentations, several keynote speakers, and interactive sessions, Recycling 2023 gives us a glimpse of faith in recycling fundamental concepts, waste treatment, and management. The conference's objective is to raise awareness of the most up-to-date techniques in this area, paving the way for development in the recycling and waste management sectors for a more promising future.

We show our appreciation for the experts by awarding them for the best speaker, oral presentation, exhibitor, and poster presentation. In order to ensure the Congress is a success, we look forward to your enthusiastic participation.

Highlighted topics:

Outline of the congress covers recycling from every angle:

  1. Solid waste management
  2. Waste water management
  3. Clinical waste management
  4. Dump yards
  5. Bioremediation
  6. Environmental pollution
  7. Effects of 3R’s in climatic change
  8. Pollution control
  9. Plastic recycling
  10. Paper recycling
  11. Agriculture and Food waste recycling
  12. Textile recycling
  13. Glass recycling
  14. E-Waste management and recycling
  15. Metal recycling
  16. Industrial waste recycling
  17. Chemical waste recycling
  18. Rubber recycling
  19. Marine oil spilling
  20. Pyrolysis
  21. Hazardous waste management
  22. Biofuel and Bioenergy
  23. Control measures
  24. Energy – from - waste
  25. Environmental sustainability
  26. Construction and demolition waste
  27. Renewable and non-renewable resources

Sessions/ Tracks

Sessions/ Tracks

Track 01: Solid waste management

All waste from sources like residential, industrial, municipal, hospital/biomedical waste, and so forth is considered solid waste. Solid waste management refers to the best practices for gathering, storing, moving, treating, and disposing of wastes without endangering the environment or other life forms. In general, there are a number of negative effects on the environment as a result of improper waste disposal. Landfills, incineration, composting, recovering, recycling, and reusing are a few methods used to combat solid waste management.

  1. Waste from various industries
  2. Management of waste
  3. Waste management procedure
  4. Disposal methods
  5. Effects of the environment

Associated Conference:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

New York State Association for Solid Waste Management | National Waste & Recycling Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | Ontario Waste Management Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Solid Waste Association of India | Solid waste association of North America | National Solid wastes Management Association | Municipal Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Journal of Solid waste technology and management | Waste management | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Resource Recycling | Recycling | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Waste management and Research | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials

Associated Societies:

International Society for Environmental Protection | Society for the Environment | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Waste management Society | Indian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | Nigerian Environmental Society | Bureau of International Recycling | International Forum of Metrological Societies 

Track 02: Waste water management

The process of treating water involves getting rid of all the impurities and enhancing its quality so that it can be used properly. Domestic sewage, storm sewage, and industrial sewage are just a few examples of the waste water that is treated and recycled. Wastewater is treated using a variety of biological processes, such as aerated lagoons, filters, and activated sludge, as well as chemical and physical water treatments.

Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary water treatment are the stages of water purification. Additionally, the treated water can be used for drinking, industrial supply, cleaning, maintaining river flow, and irrigation. The management process will aid in preserving and safeguarding the quality of fresh and marine waters. It is possible to recreate wetlands and animal habitats using recycled water.

  1. Various sectoral waste waters
  2. Wastewater processing 
  3. Effluent water treatment  
  4. Using previously used water

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

American Water Works Associations | Water and Sewer Industry Organizations | International Waster Association | New England Water works Association | National Ground Water Association | Water Environment Federation | Water Quality Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore 

Associated Journals:

Water and Wastewater treatment | Water | Waste management and Research | Waste management | Journal of Water Processing | Water and Environment Journal| Journal of Waste recycling | Journal of Applied Research in Water and Wastewater | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Waste management Society | Indian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | Society for the Environment | International Society for Environmental Protection | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Nigerian Environmental Society | Bureau of International Recycling | International Forum of Metrological Societies

Track 03: Clinical waste management

Hospitals are significant sources of high-risk hazardous waste. If clinical waste management is not carried out in accordance with the correct procedure, it may result in serious health issues, terrible diseases, and increased negative environmental effects. Infectious agents, medical waste such as used syringes, human organs, tissues, expired pills, surgical waste, toxic chemicals, and radioactive materials are all included in hospital or biomedical waste.

The following processes make up the waste management process: waste collection, type-specific sorting, storage, waste treatment, transportation to the final disposal area, and final disposal.

  1. Biological waste
  2. Safety precautions
  3. Suitable handling
  4. Environmentally harmful effects 
  5. Safe and appropriate disposal

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Hospital Waste management Association | Medicinal Waste Management Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | Ontario Waste Management Association | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Building Materials Reuse Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association

Associated Journals:

Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Waste management and Research | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology

Associated Societies: 

Indian Society of Hospital Waste Management | Waste management Society | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Society for the Environment | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Nigerian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | Indian Environmental Society | Bureau of International Recycling | International Society for Environmental Protection 

Track 04: Dump yards

A well-designed method for disposing of solid waste on or in the land is a dump yard. There are three main types of dump yards: one for hazardous waste, one for industrial waste. These dump yards decompose their contents and release methane gas, which is dangerous to the people living nearby. Therefore, dump yards are typically built far from human habitation.

A sanitary dump yard is one that has layers of sand and plastic covering the bottom to prevent waste from seeping into the groundwater. The trash is then dumped, laid out in layers, and covered with soil, gravel, clay, and soil. The waste is allowed to decompose in this location in a closed pit without affecting the nearby water bodies.

  1. Disposal method
  2. Degradation
  3. Clean landfills
  4. Disposal effects
  5. Effects on living things

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Carolina Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association | Ontario Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Journal of Waste recycling | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resource Recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Recycling | Waste management and Research | Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Energy and Environmental materials 

Associated Societies:

Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society | Waste management Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Bureau of International Recycling | Indian Environmental Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Global Recycling Foundation 

Track 05: Bioremediation

A technique called bioremediation uses microorganisms that break down the target pollutants to treat polluted surfaces like soil, oceans, and underground water. These microbes either produce enzymes that break down the harmful contaminants or consume them as food.

One of the safest methods is bioremediation, which uses microbes found naturally in the environment to destroy contaminants without the use of chemicals.

Oil spills, soil clean-up from contamination, treating contaminated underground water, and crime scene clean-up can all benefit from bioremediation.

  1. An organic process
  2. The use of eco-friendly microbes
  3. Reduce pollution

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

International Solid Waste Association | National Glass Association | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore

Associated Journals:

Energy and Environmental materials | Journal of Waste recycling | Waste management | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Waste management and Research | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management 

Associated Societies:

Nigerian Environmental Society | Society for the Environment | Waste management Society | Bureau of International Recycling | International Society for Environmental Protection | Indian Environmental Society | International Forum of Metrological Societies | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Global Recycling Foundation 

Track 06: Environmental pollution

Environmental pollution is defined as human activities that negatively impact the environment's natural processes and contaminate the earth's atmosphere physically and biologically. The major environmental problems are air pollution, land pollution, water pollution, noise pollution, plastic pollution, and marine pollution. In addition to seriously harming life forms' health, this pollution also damages the ecosystem. Lung cancer, heart disease, kidney failure, brain, and nervous system disorders are among the chronic health issues that affect people. The primary reasons for this cause are waste disposal, greenhouse gas emissions, rising temperatures, and extreme weather.

  1. Pollution causes 
  2. Environmental damage
  3. Pollutants
  4. Pollution effects 
  5. Human health risks 
  6. Global warming 

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

International Union for Conservation of Nature | United Nation Environment Programme | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Building Materials Reuse Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association

Associated Journals:

Journal of Environmental pollution and Control | National Environmental Services Center | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Energy and Environmental materials | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Waste management | Waste management and Research 

Associated Societies:

European Environment Agency |Global Recycling Foundation | Indian Environmental Society | Waste management Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Society for Environmental Protection | Society for the Environment | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Bureau of International Recycling | Nigerian Environmental Society 

Track 07: Effects of 3R’s in climatic change

Methane and CO2 are two greenhouse gases that are released into the atmosphere as a result of burning, dumping waste, and the release of toxic gases from industrial processes. Climate change and global warming are results of this. Reducing the need for new material harvesting, pollution prevention, energy conservation, and greenhouse gas emission reduction are all achieved through the use of the three R's: Reduce, Recycle, and Reuse. Typically, recycling products uses less energy than manufacturing new ones. So, by doing these three, we can change things and safeguard our natural resources.

  1. Sustainable methods
  2. Utilize, Decrease, Reprocess
  3. Global-warming
  4. Greenhouse gas emissions
  5. Protect nature

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Association of Climate Change Officers | Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change | UN Climate Change | Building Materials Reuse Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition 

Associated Journals: 

Nature Climate Change | Climate and development | Journal of Climate | Climate Change | Waste management and Research | Recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Waste management | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management

Associated Societies:

The International Panel on Climate Change  | Indian Environmental Society | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Global Recycling Foundation | Bureau of International Recycling | International Society for Environmental Protection | Waste management Society | Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society 

Track 08: Pollution control

The act of preventing or limiting the release of dangerous pollutants into the environment is known as pollution control. By conserving and protecting natural resources for future generations, pollution control helps to save the environment. Environmental protection can be achieved through the proper handling and disposal of waste products from various industries. The best way to preserve natural resources and lower pollution is to recycle waste materials like plastic, paper, glass, and metal.

  1. Toxic pollutants
  2. Waste management
  3. Recycling  
  4. Processing of wastes
  5. Control of pollution

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Indian Pollution Control Association | Worldwide Pollution Control Association | Air and Waste management Association | Western Pennsylvania Water Pollution Control Association | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association

Associated Journals:

International journal of Environment and Pollution  | Journal of Environmental pollution and Control | Journal of Pollution effects and Control | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Recycling

Associated Societies:

Nigerian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Society for the Environment | Indian Environmental Society | Waste management Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Bureau of International Recycling 

Track 09: Plastic recycling

Plastic recycling refers to a number of procedures that collect waste plastic in large quantities and turn it into useful products rather than simply dumping it on land or in water, which would pollute the environment. Since plastics are non-biodegradable products that require more work to reduce their contribution to waste, recycling plastic is one of the most challenging jobs. Plastic bags, polystyrene, and bubble wrap cannot be recycled, but HDPE plastics can. Given that plastics are low density and low value materials, recycling is difficult.

  1. Plastic waste dumps
  2. Recycled plastic
  3. Techniques for recycling plants
  4. Non-Biodegradable
  5. Health problems

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

The Association of Plastic Recyclers | Plastic recycling Association Singapore | The North American Plastic recycling Alliance | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | Ontario Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Plastic Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Waste management | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Resource Recycling | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Recycling | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental materials 

Associated Societies:

Bureau of International Recycling | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Society for Environmental Protection | Society for the Environment | Waste management Society | Indian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Nigerian Environmental Society

Track 10: Paper recycling

Paper recycling is the process of turning waste or used paper into new paper products. Napkins, tissue papers, coffee cups, and sticky papers cannot be recycled, but papers like white paper, colored paper, magazines, and newspapers can.

The recycling of paper involves several steps, including collection, sorting, shredding, pulping, filtering, and de-inking. The use of wood, water, and oil are reduced as a result of this process, which has advantages. 900 kg of recycled paper also saves about 3.6 cubic yards of landfill space, which is another benefit.

  1. The results of recycling paper
  2. The recycling procedure that is used
  3. Various kinds of recycled paper
  4. The benefits of recycling paper

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Paper- Metal recycling Association of India | The Recycling Association | Recycled Paperboard Technical Association | European Paper Recycling Council | Carolina Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | Ontario Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Journal of Waste recycling | Resource Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management and Research | Recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Waste management 

Associated Societies:

Global Recycling Foundation | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Indian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Bureau of International Recycling | Waste management Society | Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society 

Track 11: Agriculture and Food waste recycling

A variety of processes, including farming, cropping, transportation, natural waste, animal waste, cooked food, and others, result in the production of agricultural and food wastes. When these wastes are disposed of in landfills, they decompose and produce a variety of greenhouse gases that fuel global warming. Composting is the best solution because it improves soil nutrition, lowers greenhouse gas emissions, and yields biofuels and bioenergy. The environment is kept healthy for farm animals and crop production through proper waste management.

  1. The recycling of food waste
  2. GH gas emissions
  3. The preparation of biofuels
  4. Generation of bioenergy
  5. Climate modifications

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

National Waste & Recycling Association | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association

Associated Journals:

International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture | Waste management and Research | Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management | Energy and Environmental Science | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resource Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Journal of Waste recycling | Resources, Conservation and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Food and Agriculture Organization | Bureau of International Recycling | Society for the Environment | Global Recycling Foundation | Waste management Society | Nigerian Environmental Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Indian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection (ISEP)

Track 12: Textile recycling

The process of recovering used fabrics, yarn, and fibers and reprocessing them into comparable useful products is known as textile recycling. In order to reduce landfills, recycling textiles is one of the urgent practices that must be implemented in many nations. Textile products are gathered from a variety of industries and then handled in accordance with their different types, conditions, compositions, and requirements.

Decomposing fibers releases harmful gases into the atmosphere and takes thousands of years. Approximately 2,50,000 tons are thought to be dumped in landfills each year, while 63,000 tons are recycled.

  1. Landfills for textiles
  2. Procedures for recycling textiles
  3. Recyclable fabric types
  4. The breakdown of textiles
  5. The emission of dangerous gases

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Textile recycling Association | Secondary material and Recycled Textile Association | National Association for Charitable Textile Recycling | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | Arizona Recycling Coalition | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | National Glass Association | Ontario Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Recycling | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Nigerian Environmental Society | Bureau of International Recycling | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Society for the Environment | International Society for Environmental Protection | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Waste management Society | Indian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation 

Track 13: Glass recycling

With no deterioration in quality or purity, glass can be recycled 100 percent. The used glass is gathered, broken down, sorted, combined with other materials, heated to a liquid state, and then cast into the desired shapes. Recycling glass is urgently needed because it reduces the amount of landfill space that would otherwise be taken up by used glass jars and products. Recycling glass reduces air pollution by 30% and water pollution by 60%.

  1. Eliminate Landfills
  2. Glass recycling procedure: quality and purity
  3. Production of cullet
  4. Dyeing and decolorizing

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

National Glass Association | National Glass Coalition | European Federation of Glass Recycling | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Building Materials Reuse Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore  

Associated Journals:

Glass Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Waste management and Research | Waste management | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Recycling | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Glass Recycling Foundation | Global Recycling Foundation | International Society for Environmental Protection | Bureau of International Recycling | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Indian Environmental Society | Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society | Waste management Society 

Track 14: E-Waste management and recycling

E-waste is the term for waste produced by electronic appliances and gadgets. They are dangerous because the materials used to make electronics like televisions, laptops, and mobile phones include hazardous metals and chemicals.

Collection, disassembly, reduction, over-band magnet, metallic and non-metallic component separation, and water separation were the processes used. They also release harmful by products into the atmosphere, such as dioxins and hydrocarbons. The main causes of the generation of e-waste are changes in lifestyle and technological upgrades and new innovations.

  1. E-waste disposal 
  2. Electronic device dumping
  3. The method for recycling e-waste
  4. Disassembly
  5. Distinguishing between metallic and non-metallic parts

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

International Association of Electrical Waste Producer Responsibility Organizations | e-Waste Association of South Africa | International E-Waste Management Network | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Arizona Recycling Coalition | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association 

Associated Journals: 

E-Waste management | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Resource Recycling | Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling

Associated Societies:

Bureau of International Recycling | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Nigerian Environmental Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Society for Environmental Protection | Society for the Environment | Global Recycling Foundation | Indian Environmental Society | Waste management Society 

Track 15: Metal recycling

With the exception of some metals like uranium and plutonium, almost all metals can be recycled. Metals can be continuously recycled without undergoing any changes to their composition or physical characteristics. Metal recycling entails gathering scrap metal, crushing, compacting, removing non-metal components, and melting the metal in furnaces to produce metal sheets. The process of making new metals typically produces more greenhouse gases and uses more water and energy than recycling. Steel is one of the metals that is recycled the most, according to the AISI, out of all the metals.

  1. Metal waste sites
  2. Recycling of metals procedure
  3. Sheets of recycled metal
  4. More power is needed.
  5. The release of greenhouse gases

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

British Metals Recycling Association | Paper- Metal recycling Association of India | Metal Recyclers Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Vehicle Recyclers Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association | Ontario Waste Management Association

Associated Journals:

Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Waste management and Research | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Waste management | Energy and Environmental materials 

Associated Societies:

Indian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Bureau of International Recycling | Waste management Society | Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies 

Track 16: Industrial and Chemical waste recycling

Due to their releases of radioactive materials, toxic gases, and chemical waste into the atmosphere, industries are the primary causes for the significant harm done to the planet. All small-scale businesses and industries ought to recycle in order to keep the environment hygienic and clean.

Scrap metals, cleaners, paints, adhesives, dirt, gravel, and toxic chemicals are just a few of the industrial wastes that are produced. These wastes contain high concentrations of toxic substances that harm both people and wildlife by causing genetic disorders, kidney failure, and nervous and brain disorders. Each industry, small business, and business sector should have its own waste disposal methods, such as incineration, deep injection wells, and landfills.

  1. Toxic substances released
  2. Long-term risks to health
  3. Treatment of wastes in a waste management system
  4. Contaminated bodies of water

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Ontario Waste Management Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association | Industrial Waste Management Associations

Associated Journals:

Journal of Industrial Pollution Control | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Waste management and Research | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Recycling | Waste management | Energy and Environmental materials | Resources, Conservation and Recycling

Associated Societies:

American Chemical Society| Waste management Society | Nigerian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Indian Environmental Society | Bureau of International Recycling | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Global Recycling Foundation | International Forum of Metrological Societies 

Track 17: Rubber recycling

Rubber recycling refers to the process of using used or damaged rubber materials to make new rubber products that can be applied in similar ways. Because of their volume, resilience, and environmental vulnerability, recycling tires is one of the most challenging and time-consuming tasks. The advantages of recycling rubber include saving non-renewable fossil fuels, being more affordable than producing natural rubber, and having excellent properties.

  1. Process for recycling rubber
  2. Recycling tyres
  3. Ecological preservation
  4. Cost-effective production of natural rubber

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Building Materials Reuse Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association

Associated Journals:

Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Waste management | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental Science | Recycling | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Indian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Bureau of International Recycling | Waste management Society | Society for the Environment | Nigerian Environmental Society | Global Recycling Foundation | The International Panel on Climate Change  | International Forum of Metrological Societies

Track 18: Marine oil spilling

Accidental leaks or spills of refined petroleum products into the ocean, such as diesel or gasoline, are the main causes of marine oil pollution. In addition, waste oil spills and the release of bunker fuels used by large ships are included. All marine life is impacted by these pollutants in the ocean, including humans. The toxin in water is ingested by small organisms, which are then eaten by large fish, which are then consumed by humans and result in birth defects and long-term health problems. They also have an impact on corals, sea life, sea birds, and marine plants. The use of chemical dispersants, oil-absorbing pads, and biological agents are a few methods for cleaning up oil spills.

  1. Oil spill causes
  2. Large ship collisions
  3. The release of petroleum products
  4. Controlled actions
  5. Potentially harmful to marine life

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association | Building Materials Reuse Association

Associated Journals:

Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Waste management and Research | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Resource Recycling | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology

Associated Societies:

Bureau of International Recycling | International Society for Environmental Protection | Indian Environmental Society | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Global Recycling Foundation | The International Panel on Climate Change  | Nigerian Environmental Society | Waste management Society | Society for the Environment 

Track 19: Pyrolysis

Solid wastes are burned at high temperatures in sizable furnaces during the pyrolysis process, which results in much less of the waste's volume and weight being reduced and the formation of ash. Depending on the type of material, it is estimated that the volume of the waste is reduced by about 95% while the weight is reduced by about 80% to 85%. Hazardous waste, municipal waste, biomedical waste, and medical waste can all be extensively burned.

This process' energy recovery can be used to produce electricity. Sludge treatment, furnace combustion, and energy recovery comprise the three main phases of Pyrolysis. Usually, incinerators operate in remote locations without any human occupants.

  1. A high degree temperature
  2. Dangerous waste materials
  3. Procedure for burning
  4. Conducted out in industries
  5. Releasing harmful gases

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

International Solid Waste Association | National Glass Association | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore

Associated Journals:

Waste management and Research | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Journal of Waste recycling | Recycling | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Waste management | Energy and Environmental materials | Resources, Conservation and Recycling

Associated Societies:

Global Recycling Foundation | Bureau of International Recycling | Society for the Environment | Waste management Society | Indian Environmental Society | International Forum of Metrological Societies | International Society for Environmental Protection | Nigerian Environmental Society | The International Panel on Climate Change  

Track 20: Hazardous waste management

Hazardous waste includes all wastes that need to be properly treated before being disposed of. Some of them include infectious, toxic, radiological, and medical wastes. They could have negative effects on both people and animals if improperly handled.

Hazardous waste can come in either solid or liquid form, but it usually has a chemical composition. The four main techniques for handling hazardous waste are deep-well injection, landfill storage, incineration, and surface storage in sealed bins. Transport, inadequate storage, treatment, and disposal facilities can all result in damage. They lead to health problems like nausea, gastrointestinal distress, breathing difficulties, skin and eye irritation, and so forth.

  1. Proper waste management
  2. Negatively affecting the environment
  3. Genetic conditions
  4. Waste management techniques
  5. Employing chemicals

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | National Recycling Coalition | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Building Materials Reuse Association | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | National Glass Association 

Associated Journals:

Recycling | Energy and Environmental Science | Waste management and Research | Energy and Environmental materials | Journal of Waste recycling | Resource Recycling | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | International journal of Environment and Pollution | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling 

Associated Societies:

Waste management Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Society for the Environment | Bureau of International Recycling | Global Recycling Foundation | Nigerian Environmental Society | Indian Environmental Society | The International Panel on Climate Change 

Track 21: Bioenergy and Biofuel

A renewable source of energy known as "bioenergy" includes plants, animal waste, agricultural waste, and food waste. It is one of the many different resources that are available to help people meet their energy needs. Hospitals, universities, schools, and government buildings can all use the electricity and gas produced from organic matter.

Due to the fact that they are produced through biological processes rather than any geological process, biofuels are forms of renewable energy that emit less than fossil fuels. A carbon-neutral fuel known as biodiesel is typically made from vegetable oils, animal fats, or other cooking oils. It does not add to the atmospheric CO2 and is non-toxic and biodegradable. People from all over the world have begun producing bioenergy and biofuels as there is a greater need for fuels and energy.

  1. Alternative energy
  2. Natural power
  3. Biocompatible
  4. Flora and fauna waste
  5. Biological mechanisms

Associated Conferences:

Environmental sciences Conference | Environmental Science Conferences | Agriculture Conference | Plant Biotechnology Conference | Marine biology Conference | Earth Science Conference | Waste management Conference | Earth Pollution Conference | Biodegradation Conference | Food Security Conference | Environmental Science Meetings | Environmental Science Events | Environmental Science Gathering | Environmental sciences Conferences

Related associations:

Construction & Demolition Recycling Association | Building Materials Reuse Association | Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries | American Forest and Paper Association | Carolina Recycling Association | International Solid Waste Association | National Waste & Recycling Association | Arizona Recycling Coalition | Carolinas Plastics Recycling Council | New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse & Recycling, Inc. | Ontario Waste Management Association | Waste Management & Recycling Association of Singapore | National Glass Association | National Recycling Coalition

Associated Journals:

Energy and Environmental Science | Journal of Solid Waste technology and management | Journal of Waste recycling | Energy and Environmental materials | Journal of Waste resources and Recycling | Resource Recycling | Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology | Recycling | Waste management and Research | Waste management | Resources, Conservation and Recycling | International journal of Environment and Pollution 

Associated Societies:

The International Panel on Climate Change  | Bureau of International Recycling | Waste management Society | Nigerian Environmental Society | International Society for Environmental Protection | Global Recycling Foundation | International Forum of Metrological Societies | Indian Environmental Society | Society for the Environment 

Scientific Committee
OCM Member
Lingai LUO
Research Director, Department ofThermal and Energy science
French National Center for Scientific Research
Nantes, France
OCM Member
Dr Masato R. Nakamura
Environmental engineering scientist and Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Technology and Industrial Design
The City University of New York (CUNY)
New York, USA
OCM Member
Prof. Dr. Haluk Akgün
Professor, Department of Geological Engineering
Middle East Technical University (METU)
Istanbul, Turkey
OCM Member
Gilbert Sigua
Research Soil Scientist , Agriculture
Coastal Palins Soil, Water, and Plant Research Center. USDA-Agriculture Research Service
Florence, USA
OCM Member
Noori Saady
Professor, Environmental Engineering
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Saint Hyacinthe, Canada
OCM Member
Guoqian Chen
Professor, Systems Ecology and Sustainability Science
Peking University
Republica, China
OCM Member
Gyorgy Szekely
Lecturer , Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom
OCM Member
Hamidi Abdul Aziz
Professor, Environmental Engineering
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Penang, Malaysia
OCM Member
Hefa Cheng
Associate Professor, Environmental Science
Peking University
Republica, China
OCM Member
William Hogland
Professor, Department of Water Resources Engineering
Linnaeus University
Linkoping, Sweden

To Collaborate Scientific Professionals around the World

Conference Date May 11-13, 2023
Speaker Oppurtunity
Poster Oppurtunity Available
e-Poster Oppurtunity Available
Venue
&
Hospitality

Grandior Hotel Prague

Address: Na Porici 42 1 Prague 110 00

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The organizers hold no responsibilities or liabilities of the personal articles of attendees at the venue against any kind of theft, loss, damage, due to any reason whatsoever. Delegates are entirely responsible for the safety of their own belongings.

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Transportation

Please note that transportation and parking is the responsibility of the registrant, Allied Academies will not be liable for any actions howsoever related to transportation and parking.

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Press permission must be obtained from Allied Academies Conference Organizing Committee prior to the event. The press will not quote speakers or delegates unless they have obtained their approval in writing. The Allied Academies is an objective third-party nonprofit organization and this conference is not associated with any commercial meeting company.

Requesting an Invitation Letter

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Cancellation Policy

All cancellations or modifications of registration must be made in writing to finance@alliedacademies.com

If due to any reason, Allied academies postpone an event on the scheduled date, the participant is eligible for a credit of 100% of the registration fee paid. This credit shall only be used for another event organized by Allied academies within the period of one year from the date of rescheduling.

Postponement of event

If due to any reason, Allied academies postpone an event and the participant is unable or unwilling to attend the conference on rescheduled dates, he/she is eligible for a credit of 100% of the registration fee paid. This credit shall only be used for another event organized by Allied academies within the period of one year from the date of rescheduling.

Transfer of registration

All registrations, after payment of the complete registration fee, are transferable to other persons from the same organization, if in case the person is unable to attend the event. Request for transfer of registration must be made by the registered person in writing to finance@alliedacademies.com. Details must include the full name of the replaced new registrant, their title, contact phone number, and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.

Registration can be transferred from one conference to another conference of Allied academies if the person is unable to attend one of the conferences.

However, Registration cannot be transferred if intimated within 14 days of the respective conference.

The transferred registrations will not be eligible for Refund.

This cancellation policy was last updated on December 04, 2021.

Visa Information

Keeping in view of increased security measures, we would like to request all the participants to apply for Visa as soon as possible.

Allied academies will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of visa applicants. All delegates or invitees should apply for Business Visa only.

Refund Policy:

If the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund policies apply:

Keeping in view of advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels, and other overhead charges, the following Refund Policy Orders are available:

Before 60 days of the conference: Eligible for Full Refund after deduction of $100 towards service Fee.

Within 60-30 days of Conference: Eligible for 50% of payment Refund

Within 30 days of Conference: Not eligible for Refund

E-Poster Payments will not be refunded.

Accommodation Cancellation Policy:

Accommodation Service Providers (Hotels) have their own cancellation policies applicable when cancellations are made less than 30 days prior to arrival. If the registrant wishes to cancel or amend the accommodation, he/ she is expected to inform the organizing authorities on a prior basis. Allied academies will advise the registrant to ensure complete awareness about the cancellation policy of your accommodation provider, prior to cancellation or modification of their booking.

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